Course Reference 2018-07-11T11:22:47+00:00

Course Reference

This page is intended to share information regarding online and in-person courses related to sleep at universities and colleges across the globe. Please help keep it up to date by sending information to the SRS Coordinator at coordinator@srsnet.org.

Online Courses

Oxford University

Oxford Online Programme in Sleep Medicine

Requires admission to the Programme
Cost: See tuition fees

University of Pennsylvania

Current Topics in Sleep Medicine

This modular, web-based, on-demand curriculum will provide a series of up-to-date courses on core topics and clinical cases in sleep medicine from leading experts in the Division of Sleep Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. CME/CE credit will be awarded upon completion of each course in the series.

Open to the general public; requires registration

Traditional Courses Offered Through Universities

HCR 294: The Science of Sleep Behavior 

This course focuses on the nature, organization, function, and biopsychosocial determinants of sleep and sleep disorders across the lifespan, emphasizing the social and behavioral processes that influence them.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fee
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Introduction to Sleep CLPS 0120 S01/CRN: 17086

Uses sleep as the focal point for describing complex behavioral phenomena. How is sleep measured and defined? How does sleep differ across species? What accounts for the timing of sleep? How does sleep change with age? What are the behavioral, physiological, and cognitive concomitants of different states of sleep? How can dreaming be understood? What can go wrong with sleep?

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

CLPS1194: Sleep and Chronobiology Research

This course and the companion research apprenticeship provide students a fully textured research and academic experience in human sleep and chronobiology research. The course addresses the direct technical instruction for research procedures that enable students to participate in the apprenticeship projects. In support of the technical skills learning, students learn background in the physiological, theoretical, and conceptual bases of the methodologies and the research program. This information provides a framework for understanding the methods and the research projects’ design and rationale. In-depth appreciation of a research topic is acquired through preparing a research presentation.

Career modeling opportunities are offered through a seminar series with young scientists in the areas of sleep and circadian rhythms research. Students have further career modeling and learning opportunities attending the annual meeting of the Association of Professional Sleep Societies, which has a rich program for trainees. In summary, students who take part in this course and the research apprenticeship are given a thorough introduction to behavioral science research while at the same time learning about sleep and circadian rhythms physiology, acquiring lab skills, participating in ongoing research, and having the opportunity to consider a career in behavioral research through spending a summer participating in research at the sleep and chronobiology lab. Students wishing to enroll in CLPS1194 must apply to the summer apprenticeship program; the application deadline is usually mid- or late February.

Requires admission to the Brown University Summer Apprenticeship Program

PSB 3842 Sleep, Sleep Disorders and Dreaming

Overview of human sleep processes, disorders and behaviors, emphasizing the scientific study of sleep and the treatment of sleep disorders.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

PSYCH 4410 – Laboratory in Sleep Research

Emphasizing the neurobiology of sleep state, this course introduces students to the laboratory study of human sleep and its psychological correlates. Serving as both experimenter and subject, each student learns the physical rationale and techniques of electroencephalography and other bioelectric measures of behavioral state. Analyzing data they have collected themselves, students work in small groups to complete a collaborative term project. Overnight sleep recording sessions are required.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

PSYC E-1440 Sleep and Mental Health

The scientific study of sleep is an area of research that is both highly diverse and among the most interdisciplinary and unifying of topics in psychology and neuroscience. In the past several decades, exciting new discoveries on the neurobiology of sleep have been facilitated by technologies such as functional neuroimaging and molecular genetics. Nonetheless, sleep remains mysterious and controversial and, remarkably, there still is no generally agreed upon function for this behavioral state that occupies one third of our lives. Importantly, sleep science exemplifies the translational approach in biomedical science whereby human and animal research together continually advance the field of sleep medicine. Following an overview on the physiology and behavioral neuroscience of sleep, students choose a topic related to the effects of sleep on mental health to research in depth.

These topics might include the characteristic abnormalities in sleep occurring in mood, anxiety, psychotic, addictive, autism spectrum or neurodegenerative disorders. Such changes are increasingly seen as bidirectional, with sleep disturbances contributing to the waking symptoms of these mental disorders. Other topics might focus on the contribution of primary sleep disorders to psychiatric and neurological illness such as the linkage between sleep apnea and depression, circadian rhythm disorders in bipolar illness, insomnia as a risk factor for mood and anxiety disorders or contribution of nocturnal seizures to neurodevelopmental disorders. Still other topics may focus on the contribution of normal sleep to emotional regulation, memory consolidation and human performance factors. For those with more neuroscientific interests, topics might include neuroimaging of cognitive functioning following sleep deprivation or the growing interest in trafficking and disposal of abnormal proteins during sleep having a potential role in neurodegenerative illness.

Requires admission to the Extension School
Cost: See tuition fees

Introductory Sleep Course

The Introductory Sleep Course is offered monthly during the academic year by the Faculty Preceptors of the Training Program in Sleep, Circadian and Respiratory Neurobiology. This is a free course, open to all students, fellows and faculty, and its format is an informal and interactive lecture series.

Requires affiliation with the Medical School
Cost: Free

MCB186, Circadian Biology: From Cellular Oscillators to Sleep Regulation 

This seminar addresses the properties, mechanisms, and functional roles of circadian (daily) rhythms in organisms ranging from unicells to mammals. Cellular and molecular components, regulation of gene expression and physiological functions, genetic and biochemical analyses of circadian rhythms, and neurobiology of the mammalian circadian pacemaker. Mathematics and modeling of oscillatory systems and applications to circadian rhythms. Experimental studies of human rhythms, including the sleep-wake cycle and hormone rhythms, with applications to sleep disorders.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

MBB 980A: MBB 980A Conscious States: Waking, Sleeping, and Dreaming

Focuses on waking, sleeping, and dreaming as examples of conscious states in both humans and animals. Original papers and Antonio Damasio’s book (The Feeling of What Happens) form the background for discussions of waking, sleeping, and dreaming from the perspectives of neurology, physiology, psychology, and cognitive neurosciences. Discusses various approaches to understanding the functions of sleep and wake (consciousness) and reviews several theories on the topic.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

FRSEMR 22D – Time for Sleep: Impact of sleep deficiency and circadian disruption in our 24/7 Culture 

What is sleep? Why do we sleep? Why don’t we sleep? How much sleep do you need? What are circadian rhythms? How do technology and culture impact sleep? Evaluates the role of sleep and circadian timing in maintaining health, improving performance and enhancing safety. Explores causes and consequences of the epidemic of sleep disorders and deficiency in our society, with particular attention to impacts on brain (learning and memory, mood and cognition) and body (appetite and metabolism, hormones and heart) functions. Personal and public policy approaches to issues such as drowsy students, drowsy drivers and drowsy doctors will be addressed.

Requires admission to the University, and the course is for freshmen only
Cost: See tuition fees

FRSEMR 26F – Dreams: Our Mind by Night 

This course examines dreams with an emphasis on their relation to the creative process and problem solving. It draws on psychology predominantly-neurophysiology, clinical, and personality research while also including perspectives from history, religion, art, literature, and anthropology. We’ll visit a sleep laboratory and a dream-artist’s studio. Students will keep a dream journal, and engage in exercises to improve dream recall, influence content toward lucidity and other goals, and to interpret your dreams. Students will write a term paper on a dream-related topic of their choice.

Requires admission to the University, and the course is for freshmen only
Cost: See tuition fees

NEUROBIO 328L – Role of Sleep in Memory and Emotional Processing in Healthy Subjects, Schizophrenia, Autism, and PTS 

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

NEUROBIO 329L – The Genetic and Neural Basis of Sleep in Drosophila 

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

NEUROBIO 364 – Hypothalamic Circuitry Controlling Sleep and Circadian Rhythms 

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

NEUROBIO 371 – Sensory Neuron Development and Sleep Using Genetics and Live Imaging in Zebrafish

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

Psyc 578 Sleep and Sleep Disorders

Topics include the phylogeny and ontogeny of sleep, sleep-wake circadian rhythms, sleep deprivation, sleep and cognition, the neurobiology of sleep, hypnogogic imagery, dreams and nightmares, and the assessment, etiology, and treatment of sleep disorders including insomnia, violence during sleep, narcolepsy, sleep apnea, and sleep disturbances caused by medical disorders.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

Psychology 133 – Psychology of Sleep

This course has two primary goals: (1) to provide a basic introduction to the study of sleep and an overview of sleep measurement, regulation, ontogeny, phylogeny, physiology, and psychology; and (2) to provide a basic introduction to sleep disorders including their classification, cause, and treatment.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) and Transdiagnostic Sleep Problems in Clinical Practice: Basics and Beyond PSYCH 1018

Sleep disturbance is a significant health problem that may present as a primary disorder or co-morbidity with another medical or psychiatric condition. There is an established evidence base indicating that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for many sleep disturbances, even when the sleep disturbance is co-morbid with another psychiatric or medical disorder. This workshop provides an overview of the major sleep disturbances, particularly insomnia, delayed sleep phase, reduced need for sleep and hypersomnia. Examine the complexities of assessing and conducting a case conceptualization for a patient with a sleep problem within a transdiagnostic framework. Special topics to be covered include cognitive therapy, hypersomnia, teens and sleep problems, and adapting the evidence-based treatment for sleep problems in other patient groups using patients with a mood disorder as the primary example.

Open to the general public
Cost: See tuition fees

Physiological Science C126. Biological Clocks

Most organisms, including humans, exhibit daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. In many cases these rhythms are generated from within organisms and are called circadian rhythms. Biological basis of these daily rhythms or circadian oscillations. Exploration of molecular, cellular, and system-level organization of these timing systems. Temporal role of these variations in maintaining homeostatic mechanisms of body and impact on nervous system. Concurrently scheduled with course C226. Letter grading.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

Psychology 119Q: Psychology of Sleep and Dreams

Designed for juniors/seniors. Review of measurement and comparison of sleep in mammals and submammalian species, circadian rhythms and circadian control of sleep, development and aging of sleep, neural and neurochemical control of sleep, effects of sleep deprivation, sleep in psychiatric disorders, human sleep disorders, and function of dreams. P/NP or letter grading.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees


Psychology 164: Puberty and Sleep

Limited to juniors/seniors. Exploration of how normative biological and hormonal changes during adolescence influence adolescent behavior and well-being. Focus specifically on puberty and sleep, which both lead to consequential effects on behavior, health, and brain development. P/NP or letter grading.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

Epidemiology 274: Topics in Chronobiology 

Introduction to basic concepts and principles of circadian biology and how they relate to chronic disease epidemiology. Circadian disruption and sleep, biomarkers of circadian system, and design, as well as methods to study these principles in modern epidemiology, with emphasis on biologic aspects and relevant disease mechanisms. S/U or letter grading.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

133. Circadian Rhythms—Biological Clocks 

This interdisciplinary course provides an overview of the fundamental properties of daily biological clocks of diverse species, from humans to microbes. Emphasis is placed on the relevance of internal time keeping in wide-ranging contexts including human performance, health, and industry. Cross-listed with BIMM 116.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

191. Psychology of Sleep 

This course provides an overview of the psychology of sleep, including sleep stages and their functions, neurological aspects of sleep, sleep across species and development, dreams and their interpretation, sleep disorders, and the role of sleep in learning and memory.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

Edinburgh Sleep Medicine Course

We will focus on the fundamentals of adult sleep medicine and discuss recent developments. We aim to increase the profile of the discipline to encourage more research, networking and training opportunities.

Open to healthcare professionals
Cost: 900£

PSB 3842 Sleep, Sleep Disorders and Dreaming

Overview of human sleep processes, disorders and behaviors, emphasizing the scientific study of sleep and the treatment of sleep disorders.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

PSY4327 Sleep and Dreams

Sleep and dreams in the context of psychological adaptation. Sleep cycle. Functions of sleep, especially REM. Sleep disorders and their treatment. Theories of dream functions. Dream recall. Analysis of dream content. Dreams, personality and culture. Dream control and adaptation to stress.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

BIO 149: The Neurobiology of Sleep 

Preference to seniors and graduate students. The neurochemistry and neurophysiology of changes in brain activity and conscious awareness associated with changes in the sleep/wake state. Behavioral and neurobiological phenomena including sleep regulation sleep homeostasis, circadian rhythms, sleep disorders, sleep function, and the molecular biology of sleep. Enrollment limited to 16.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees

PSYC 135: Sleep and Dreams

The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives– both physical and mental functions of our well-being. The course covers the science of sleep, dreams, and the pathophysiology of highly prevalent sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, biological rhythms, and focuses on the physiology of non-REM and REM sleep. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students’ attitudes about the importance of sleep. Learning about the science of sleep provides tangible reason to respect sleep as a member of what we term the triumvirate of health: good nutrition, physical fitness, and healthy sleep.

Requires admission to the University
Cost: See tuition fees